NHAPTA Chief Delegate Report

Attached is the APTA NH2020 Delegate Caucus presentation.

This was prepared by APTA NH Chief Delegate, Ami Faria.

Feel free to contact Ami with any questions or input: Ami.Faria@genesishcc.com 

Delegate Caucus Presentation 

 

 

January 13, 2020

Chief Delegate update for NH BOD 

These are the current motions/issues being considered by Delegates for the 2020 House of Delegates (HOD). Input on any/all issues welcome:

  • Proposed Motion: INVESTIGATE THE PROBLEM OF UNCOMPENSATED PHYSICAL THERAPY CARE

      • That the American Physical Therapy Association investigate and develop recommendations to address the problem of uncompensated care provision by physical therapists and physical therapist assistants. This investigation shall also include identification of barriers during attempts to provide care that would otherwise be uncompensated.  A report shall be provided to the 2021 American Physical Therapy House of Delegates.

  • NJ proposes the following amendment to the Core Values of the PT and PTA, under the Accountability value:

      • Accountability is active acceptance of the responsibility for the diverse roles, obligations, and actions of the physical therapist and physical therapist assistant including self‐regulation and other behaviors that positively influence patient and client outcomes, the profession, and the health needs of society.

  • The Student Assembly and PTA Caucus are considering an amendment to RC 41-19, which was passed as follows: The American Physical Therapy Association supports the use of an oath for physical therapist students and for physical therapists to reflect commitment to patients, clients, society, and the profession to incorporate parallel language regarding the use of a pledge by S/PTAs as well.

  • RC 36-19 was passed as The American Physical Therapy Association supports environmental stewardship. Members are encouraged to adopt environmentally responsible practices and use alternatives to environmentally harmful products or substances whenever possible in their professional and personal lives. Proposed new language would be: For the health of individuals, communities, society, and the environment, the American Physical Therapy Association supports environmental stewardship and the adoption of environmentally sustainable practices by individuals, organizations, and clinical practices.

  • Proposed Motion: The APTA supports and encourages individuals to advocate for public awareness of the impact of climate change on the health and safety of individuals, communities, and society.

  • The Massachusetts delegation is considering bringing forward a motion to restructure the Code of Ethics and the Code of Conduct for the PTA.  Specifically, a motion that would shift the responsibility for the subsidiary principles (the lettered principles following the primary principle) in both documents over to the Ethics and Judicial Committee (EJC) for on-going oversight, review, revision and addition. 

  • PROPOSED Motion by the PENNSYLVANIA CHAPTER AMENDMENT: BYLAWS OF THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION, ARTICLE VIII: HOUSE OF DELEGATES, SECTION 3: VOTING DELEGATES, A. QUALIFICATIONS OF VOTING DELEGATES, (1) CHAPTER DELEGATES

      • That Bylaws of the American Physical Therapy Association, Article VIII. House of Delegates, Section 3: Voting Delegates, A. Qualifications of Voting Delegates, (1) Chapter delegates, be amending by adding the words, “A one-time, lifetime exception shall be made for a lapse in membership of no more than 90 days to allow that member to serve as chapter delegate

  • Proposed Motion by NJ: Amendment to GUIDELINES: RECRUITING AND HIRING INTERNATIONALLY EDUCATED PHYSICAL THERAPISTS

      • The employer complies with the “Labor Condition Application” (LCA) process required by the Department of Labor1.

      • The employer complies with the H-1B visa regulations set forth by the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS)2

      • The employer, when assuming the legal responsibility for the application process for a candidate, monitors the completion of the educational credentialing process for the physical therapist, including monitoring that any additional required course work is from regionally accredited institutions.

      • There is disclosure by the employer of ownership of the practice details and the setting type (such as contract or specific facility).

      • A no-penalty bailout provision is provided in the event of change of ownership.

      • Avoidance of noncompete clauses is recommended but if there is reasonable limitation of time and distance, one may be incorporated within jurisdictional law.

      • The employer advises the physical therapist that his or her interest is best served by obtaining appropriate counsel prior to signing the contract.

      • The contract is written for the jurisdiction(s) in which the physical therapist will practice.

      • All agreements are presented to the physical therapist in English and the option for a copy in the language native to the internationally educated physical therapist.

      • The employer provides services for cultural orientation of the physical therapist.

  • Proposed By: Washington and Kansas Chapters: THE ROLE OF THE PHYSICAL THERAPIST AND THE AMERICAN PHYSICAL THERAPY ASSOCIATION IN SLEEP HEALTH

      • The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) supports physical therapists as part of an interdisciplinary team of licensed health services providers in prevention and management of sleep impairments and promotion of healthy sleep behaviors. Sleep health has a significant impact on the overall physical health of individuals and society. The physical therapist’s role includes using the best available evidence and standards of practice to:   

      • Screen for sleep dysfunction;

      • Refer to sleep medicine professionals as indicated;    

      • Identify impairments related to sleep dysfunction; 

      • Implement and progress therapeutic interventions to address identified sleep impairments as they relate to physical function;  

      • Educate society, patients and clients, caregivers and providers on sleep health and the relationship between sleep, pain, physical activity, and function; and 

      • Monitor sleep quality and quantity in patients and clients to enhance physical therapy outcomes. 

      • Healthy sleep is a key component of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of many conditions that are managed by physical therapists. Sleep plays a critical role in multiple functions including immune and metabolic function, tissue healing, pain modulation, cardiovascular health, cognition, physical function and quality of life. Sleep dysfunction can occur across the lifespan in individuals with various conditions treated by physical therapists. It is within the professional scope of the physical therapist to screen for and provide evidence-based interventions to address sleep health in patients, clients, and in the community. 

      • The APTA supports collaboration to promote education, research, and practice between physical therapists and sleep medicine professionals to enhance the health and well-being of society.

  • Proposed Motion by MD: COMMITMENT TO PATIENT SAFETY

      • The American Physical Therapy Association supports efforts by physical therapists and physical therapist assistants to transform the delivery of health care services and achieve the goal of zero patient harm.

  • PROPOSED BY:  ARIZONA CHAPTER: RC X-20 CHARGE: FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR PHYSICAL THERAPIST AND PHYSICAL THERAPIST ASSISTANTS

      • That the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) cooperate with its education partners to help achieve APTA'S 2019-2021 strategic plan for Stewardship: Foster Long-Term Sustainability of the Physical Therapy Profession – champion student and early-career issues including debt burden and career-earning potential, by requiring the annual submission of the following data from all accredited programs, and publishing the information in a format that is easily accessible and comparable between institutions by all stakeholders:

    • Cohort size of the first-year class*

    • Total published cost of tuition for the entire program (not by unit, semester, or term because these vary by institution)

    • Total additional fees charged for the entire program

    • Average annual living expenses for the geographical area of the program

    • Using total published cost of tuition and additional fees for the entire program, a ranking from most to least expensive programs, differentiating private and public schools

    • A link to each program’s curriculum, listed by each academic session each year*

    • Ultimate National Physical Therapy Examination (NPTE) pass rate for each program (not first time, but the ultimate pass rate) *

    • Accurate graduate employment rate at 6 months after graduation*

    • Average graduate indebtedness of the most recently graduated cohort excluding debt not specific to the physical therapist or physical therapist assistant program.

    • Note* data currently collected or required to be published by the Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE)

  • Proposed by the Private Practice Section: Practice and Business Financial Arrangements for Physical Therapists

      • The American Physical Therapy Association supports collaborative practice and business models that are innovative, ethical, person-centered, and advance the health of individuals, patient and client populations, and communities. APTA believes that patients are better served, and physical therapists' practices are strengthened, when physical therapists collaborate with other providers. Physical therapists strive to create business financial arrangements consistent with APTA positions and policies, including the following principles:

      • 1. The primary motivation for collaboration is to bring to market a valuable and competitive service that could not otherwise exist acting independently.

      • 2. The business entity (ies) provide(s) value* for the consumer. * (higher quality, same cost; same quality, lower cost; lower cost, higher quality)

      • 3. The business entity (ies) has the ability to access, coordinate, or develop data that demonstrate competitive costs and outcomes.

      • 4. The business entity (ies) retain(s) organizational flexibility to respond to regulatory, technical, and practice pattern changes, and to modify incentives.

      • 5. The business entity (ies) prioritize best clinical practices above business/financial aims.

      • 6. The business entity (ies) comply with laws and regulations, such as anti-trust and Stark laws.

 

 

Submitted by Ami Faria, APTA NH Chief Delegate

 APTA

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